Dating Violence

Dating and relationship violence is a pattern of coercive and abusive tactics employed by one person in a relationship to gain power and control over  another person. It can take many forms, including physical violence, coercion, threats, intimidation, isolation, and emotional, sexual or economic abuse.

Section Title

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

  • The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

  • For the purposes of this definition:

    • Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

    • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

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Texas-Set-to-Add-Teen-Dating-Violence-Awareness-to-Health-Ed-Curriculum.webp

Section Title

Warning Signs of Abusive Behaviors

  • Exhibits jealousy when you talk to others. May say that his/her jealousy is a sign of love.

  • Consistently accuses a partner of flirting or cheating, or treats other important relationships in a partner’s life with suspicion.

  • Tries to control where you go, whom you go with, what you wear, say, do, etc.

  • Attempts to isolate you from loved ones. May try to cut you off from  resources, friends and family.

  • Uses force, coercion or manipulation in sexual activity.

  • Degrades or puts you down. Dismisses accomplishments that you achieve.

  • Displays frequent mood or behavior swings. May be kind one minute and exploding the next; charming in public and cruel in private.​​

  • Threatens to use physical force. Breaks or strikes objects to intimidate you.

  • Physically restrains you from leaving the room, pushes, shoves you, etc.

  • Has hit other partners in the past but assures you that the violence was provoked.

  • May exhibit economic control by not allowing you to go to work, have access or control of your money or paycheck, or access to your car.